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Ibsley and Broomy Inclosure

Wednesday, May 25th, 2011

Another glorious day. The dry weather continues and we enjoy walks at Ibsley Common in the morning and in Broomy Inclosure in the afternoon.

Ibsley Common

After walking up onto the Common, I follow a path that goes up hill and down dale through the Chibden Bottoms, here looking back over Little Chibden Bottom with Newlands Plantation in the distance…

Chibden Bottom

… and looking ahead down into Chibden Bottom. We’re heading up the steep hill to Robin Hood’s Clump on the ridge.

The dry stream bed in Chibden Bottom

The dry stream bed in Chibden Bottom. Very dry – we desperately need some rain!

Across Chibden Bottom with Whitefield Plantation in the distance

Looking across Chibden Bottom with Whitefield Plantation in the distance. These hills might not be very high, but they really are quite steep, this photo doesn’t really do them justice.

Robin Hood's Clump basking under a cloudless sky

Robin Hood’s Clump basking under a cloudless sky.

The blast wall of the Direction Finding Station, one of the World War II remains found around the old Ibsley airfield

After following the ridge and circling around above Chibden Bottom, we reach the blast wall of the Direction Finding Station, one of the World War II remains found around the old Ibsley airfield with Robin Hood’s Clump on the far ridge.

On the inside of the octagonal blast wall is this little verse

On the inside of the octagonal blast wall is this little verse.

Great Broomrape or Orobanche Rapum Genistae

Back in the old gravel pit on the way back to the car I find these weird looking plants around the base of some of the gorse bushes. I’ve never seen it before and after putting my photos up onto iSpot (I thought it might be some oversized type of orchid), found out what they were. Great Broomrape or Orobanche. Broomrape seeds apparently remain dormant in the soil, often for many years, until stimulated to germinate by certain compounds produced by living plant roots. Broomrape seedlings put out a root-like growth, which attaches to the roots of nearby hosts. Once attached to a host, the broomrape robs its host of water and nutrients.

A wild aqualegia

A wild aqualegia.

Down to Broomy Inclosure for a wander through the inclosure itself and then back along Dockens Water.

New growth on a pine tree creates lovely patterns of shades of green

New growth on a pine tree creates lovely patterns of shades of green.

Last of the bluebells in a ditch

Last of the bluebells in a ditch.

The green grassy paths are shaded by oak trees

The green grassy paths are shaded by oak trees.

Out of the inclosure now and looking across to Sloden Inclosure

Out of the inclosure now and looking across to Sloden Inclosure, there is an ancient Royal Hunting Lodge up there and a huge earthwork.

The twists and turns of Dockens Water

The twists and turns of Dockens Water.

The cirrus cloud over Ragged Boys Hill is amazing tonight

The cirrus cloud over Ragged Boys Hill is amazing tonight.

Further round to the left it extends over Sloden

Further round to the left it extends over Sloden.

This is Splash Bridge over Dockens Water

This is Splash Bridge over Dockens Water. For the riders out there, this path that stretches away up to Hasley Inclosure is marvellous for a good canter or gallop.

A last look back at Sloden and that cloud

A last look back at Sloden and that cloud.

A flag iris - and a fly

A flag iris – and a fly.


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